Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds in Exhaled Breath for Detection of Diabetes Mellitus and Cholesterol


Authors : Rajesh Sudi; Skanda A Sugam; Abhishek Bharadwaj; Srivatsa R; Harshavardhan HP

Volume/Issue : Volume 7 - 2022, Issue 7 - July

Google Scholar : https://bit.ly/3IIfn9N

Scribd : https://bit.ly/3dq7jjK

DOI : https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6982383

Abstract : In this modern era, lifestyle-related illnesses have become increasingly common and the need for technology that makes diagnosing them easier and faster is growing. Respiratory analysis is the most promising field for research that has the potential to diagnose volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its focus on the respiratory tract and has the potential to detect and monitor disease progression. Regarding the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, glucose levels are calculated in the most painful, time-consuming, and aggressive manner which is why there has always been an urgent need for the development of a non-invasive, sensitive sensory system. Acetone is one of the effective biomarkers of glucose level but also appears to be a fast, flexible alternative to normal blood sugar levels. In response, we have developed a model of a portable non-invasive tool that explores the ability to analyze the respiratory signal as a means of monitoring glucose saturation with the help of a sensor for Acetone through which the effects will be realistic. About 11% of Body cholesterol was present in the skin and evenly to the percentage found in the blood. This study focuses on simplicity and uncommon ways to measure cholesterol. Near Infrared (NIR) is a long light when the wavelength of the wave passes 700nm-1400nm from visible light in the electromagnetic spectrum. Non-invasive blood analysis methods were presented when the blood was lit in several different waves selected in the NIR spectrum, based on information obtained from analysis of skin parts using a simple test. The intensity of light reflected or transmitted at such wavelengths was measured.

Keywords : Diabetes Mellitus, Breath Analysis, Volatile Organic Compounds, Blood Cholesterol, Non Invasive, Near Infrared

In this modern era, lifestyle-related illnesses have become increasingly common and the need for technology that makes diagnosing them easier and faster is growing. Respiratory analysis is the most promising field for research that has the potential to diagnose volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its focus on the respiratory tract and has the potential to detect and monitor disease progression. Regarding the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, glucose levels are calculated in the most painful, time-consuming, and aggressive manner which is why there has always been an urgent need for the development of a non-invasive, sensitive sensory system. Acetone is one of the effective biomarkers of glucose level but also appears to be a fast, flexible alternative to normal blood sugar levels. In response, we have developed a model of a portable non-invasive tool that explores the ability to analyze the respiratory signal as a means of monitoring glucose saturation with the help of a sensor for Acetone through which the effects will be realistic. About 11% of Body cholesterol was present in the skin and evenly to the percentage found in the blood. This study focuses on simplicity and uncommon ways to measure cholesterol. Near Infrared (NIR) is a long light when the wavelength of the wave passes 700nm-1400nm from visible light in the electromagnetic spectrum. Non-invasive blood analysis methods were presented when the blood was lit in several different waves selected in the NIR spectrum, based on information obtained from analysis of skin parts using a simple test. The intensity of light reflected or transmitted at such wavelengths was measured.

Keywords : Diabetes Mellitus, Breath Analysis, Volatile Organic Compounds, Blood Cholesterol, Non Invasive, Near Infrared

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