Decoloniality and Educational Change: Cultivating a Living Philosophy to Overcome Decoloniality and Violence in African Universities


Authors : Dube, S.P; Waghid, Y; Dube, T. Chaplain; Chamisa, J. A

Volume/Issue : Volume 7 - 2022, Issue 7 - July

Google Scholar : https://bit.ly/3IIfn9N

Scribd : https://bit.ly/3oODeNp

DOI : https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6957752

Abstract : - Drawing on the Zimbabwean experience since independence of 1980 till present, there has arisen a crisis of identifying the real problem that has caused the instability and fragility of the political and economic affairs of the country. The scenario has been seen intruding into the higher education system that still suffers from colonial rule with citizens struggling to come to terms with such a reality. The problems faced pave a way for unsustainability yet education would be expected to lead to change and sustainable development. Democratic efforts have been made by policy makers to bring education reforms that would resolve many challenges through embarking on a process of decoloniality, however, the crisis persists. The aim of this paper is to bridge this gap by showing how decoloniality can be achieved through de-westernisation without demodernization. The purpose is to show that democratic citizenship education can also be achieved with modernity. The paper employs the concepts of decoloniality, westernisation, modernity, democracy and citizenship in Zimbabwe education system and will also review modernity aspects of technology, civilization, peace and development from literary works. Vigorous debate has arisen on the problem of the lingering effects of colonialism and westernization on education by many scholars. The debate is that whilst we talk of enslavement and colonisation of people by another, people has a tendency of forgetting that colonial education systems and ideological indoctrination also shaped Zimbabweans. Despite colonization, Zimbabweans progressed. Colonisation is viewed as having had positive effects of intellectual influence, cultural transition and political cleanliness was rewarded. The negative effects are not ignored. The main argument will be based on arguments against colonialism because it is tantamount to enslavement. Decoloniality then can be seen as identifying human profits from the political, economic and intellectual point of view in order to achieve democratic citizenship education. A problem of lingering effects of colonization and westernisation on education and how lessons for Zimbabwe can be produced are identified and stages of solving the problem are suggested. The stages are that of de-westernising in order to decolonize and observing the effects of both post coloniality and post modernity. Most education scholars write about postcolonial issues and overlook modernity. The relationships between education, society, economy and politics are discussed with particular reference to democratic citizenship education which does not remove modernity invented from the west. The main findings of the chapter are based on the following: There appears to be lack of understanding of the difference between coloniality, westernisation and modernity, and there is a crisis of democracy in politics and educational issues. Decoloniality has been misunderstood especially during the process of trying to reconcile the oppressor and the oppressed so that they become members of family. The conclusion of the chapter suggests recommendations and considerations for government, policymakers and stakeholders who can plan on how the country can benefit.

Keywords : Decoloniality, Colonisation, Westernisation, Modernity, Democracy, Citizenship, Education, Technology, Civilization, Peace and Sustainable development

- Drawing on the Zimbabwean experience since independence of 1980 till present, there has arisen a crisis of identifying the real problem that has caused the instability and fragility of the political and economic affairs of the country. The scenario has been seen intruding into the higher education system that still suffers from colonial rule with citizens struggling to come to terms with such a reality. The problems faced pave a way for unsustainability yet education would be expected to lead to change and sustainable development. Democratic efforts have been made by policy makers to bring education reforms that would resolve many challenges through embarking on a process of decoloniality, however, the crisis persists. The aim of this paper is to bridge this gap by showing how decoloniality can be achieved through de-westernisation without demodernization. The purpose is to show that democratic citizenship education can also be achieved with modernity. The paper employs the concepts of decoloniality, westernisation, modernity, democracy and citizenship in Zimbabwe education system and will also review modernity aspects of technology, civilization, peace and development from literary works. Vigorous debate has arisen on the problem of the lingering effects of colonialism and westernization on education by many scholars. The debate is that whilst we talk of enslavement and colonisation of people by another, people has a tendency of forgetting that colonial education systems and ideological indoctrination also shaped Zimbabweans. Despite colonization, Zimbabweans progressed. Colonisation is viewed as having had positive effects of intellectual influence, cultural transition and political cleanliness was rewarded. The negative effects are not ignored. The main argument will be based on arguments against colonialism because it is tantamount to enslavement. Decoloniality then can be seen as identifying human profits from the political, economic and intellectual point of view in order to achieve democratic citizenship education. A problem of lingering effects of colonization and westernisation on education and how lessons for Zimbabwe can be produced are identified and stages of solving the problem are suggested. The stages are that of de-westernising in order to decolonize and observing the effects of both post coloniality and post modernity. Most education scholars write about postcolonial issues and overlook modernity. The relationships between education, society, economy and politics are discussed with particular reference to democratic citizenship education which does not remove modernity invented from the west. The main findings of the chapter are based on the following: There appears to be lack of understanding of the difference between coloniality, westernisation and modernity, and there is a crisis of democracy in politics and educational issues. Decoloniality has been misunderstood especially during the process of trying to reconcile the oppressor and the oppressed so that they become members of family. The conclusion of the chapter suggests recommendations and considerations for government, policymakers and stakeholders who can plan on how the country can benefit.

Keywords : Decoloniality, Colonisation, Westernisation, Modernity, Democracy, Citizenship, Education, Technology, Civilization, Peace and Sustainable development

Never miss an update from Papermashup

Get notified about the latest tutorials and downloads.

Subscribe by Email

Get alerts directly into your inbox after each post and stay updated.
Subscribe
OR

Subscribe by RSS

Add our RSS to your feedreader to get regular updates from us.
Subscribe