Determination of some Heavy Metals in Clarias Batrachus (Linnaeus, 1758) and Channa Striata (Bloch, 1793) in Meiktila Lake, Meiktila, Mandalay Region, Myanmar


Authors : Khin Myint Mar.

Volume/Issue : Volume 4 - 2019, Issue 1 - January

Google Scholar : https://goo.gl/DF9R4u

Scribd : https://goo.gl/vLzbFi

Thomson Reuters ResearcherID : https://goo.gl/KTXLC3

Abstract : A total of 20 fish samples of two fish species; Clarias batrachus (Nga khu) and Channa striata (Nga yant) from the South Lake of Meiktila Lake was analyzed for the concentration of copper (Cu) as an essential metal and lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) as nonessential metals during December 2017 to September 2018. The mean body length of Clarias batrachus was 11.88 ± 1.55 cm and its mean body weight 230.34 ± 29.08 g. The mean body length of Channa striata was 13.05 ± 1.59 cm and its mean body weight 186.96 ± 41.60 g. The metal concentration in the water and fish samples were determined by Atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) (AA-6300). In the present study, the mean concentration of copper in Clarias batrachus was 1.045 ± 0.18 ppm (part per million) (range, 0.80 – 1.42 ppm) and that of Channa striata was 0.48 ± 0.11 ppm (range, 0.36 – 0.72 ppm) that was far from permissible limits set down by FAO/WHO (1992). The level of Cu between fish species studied was significantly different (p < 0.05). Lead was not found in the water and fish samples analyzed. The mean concentration of Cd in Clarias batrachus was 0.07 ± 0.15 ppm and that in Channa striata 0.053 ± 0.095 ppm. The level of Cd between Clarias batrachus and Channa striata was not significantly different (p > 0.05). The accumulation of cadmium in the muscle of fish studied was around the permissible limits set down by EU (0.1 ppm) and FAO/WHO, European Communities (EC), United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) (0.05 ppm). The results of this study showed that some of the examined fish samples were not fully safe for human consumption due to high level of cadmium.

Keywords : Channa Striata; Clarias Batrachus; Meiktila Lake; Cd; Cu; Permissible Limits.

A total of 20 fish samples of two fish species; Clarias batrachus (Nga khu) and Channa striata (Nga yant) from the South Lake of Meiktila Lake was analyzed for the concentration of copper (Cu) as an essential metal and lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) as nonessential metals during December 2017 to September 2018. The mean body length of Clarias batrachus was 11.88 ± 1.55 cm and its mean body weight 230.34 ± 29.08 g. The mean body length of Channa striata was 13.05 ± 1.59 cm and its mean body weight 186.96 ± 41.60 g. The metal concentration in the water and fish samples were determined by Atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) (AA-6300). In the present study, the mean concentration of copper in Clarias batrachus was 1.045 ± 0.18 ppm (part per million) (range, 0.80 – 1.42 ppm) and that of Channa striata was 0.48 ± 0.11 ppm (range, 0.36 – 0.72 ppm) that was far from permissible limits set down by FAO/WHO (1992). The level of Cu between fish species studied was significantly different (p < 0.05). Lead was not found in the water and fish samples analyzed. The mean concentration of Cd in Clarias batrachus was 0.07 ± 0.15 ppm and that in Channa striata 0.053 ± 0.095 ppm. The level of Cd between Clarias batrachus and Channa striata was not significantly different (p > 0.05). The accumulation of cadmium in the muscle of fish studied was around the permissible limits set down by EU (0.1 ppm) and FAO/WHO, European Communities (EC), United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) (0.05 ppm). The results of this study showed that some of the examined fish samples were not fully safe for human consumption due to high level of cadmium.

Keywords : Channa Striata; Clarias Batrachus; Meiktila Lake; Cd; Cu; Permissible Limits.

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